RESEARCH MISSION

Our research goal is to integrate fundamental research in novel macromolecular structure and polymerization processes with the development of high performance macromolecules for advanced technologies. Our research platforms focus on the design, performance, and societal implications of novel materials for the following:

  1. Additive manufacturing
  2. Bio-inspired thermoplastics
  3. Adhesive technology
  4. Charged polymers for actuators

These four complementary platforms provide cutting-edge research opportunities and significant impact on global issues, while also providing sufficient breadth for the alignment of universities and international organizations. For current information, go to the Students page in the Meet the Group section to read more about ongoing projects.

AREAS OF INTEREST

The Long Research Group investigates structure-property-morphology-processing relationships of polymers, ranging from high performance thermoplastics and thermosets to biologically derived/inspired macromolecules. In particular, the Long Research Group focuses on the effect of noncovalent interactions on the resulting polymer properties, including hydrogen bonding and ionic aggregation. The design, performance, and societal implications of novel polymeric materials directs our research platform, which focuses on the following impactful technologies:

  1. New materials for advanced manufacturing
  2. Bio-inspired thermoplastics
  3. Adhesive technology
  4. Charged polymers for actuators

Polymers featuring tailored monomer sequences and designs afford microphase-separated structures and enhance the performance of adhesives and 3D printing technology. The use of biologically derived monomers, such as urea, afford bio-degradable thermoplastics which release significant levels of ammonia. Alternatively, nucleobase-containing polymers afford sequence-controlled adhesives and microphase-separated morphologies. 3D printing techniques enables controlled polymer placement, unlocking architectures and constructs never engineered before. Taking advantage of these techniques allows for the unprecedented processing of polyimides or development of time-controlled dissolvable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based constructs. Lastly, structure-property relationship development of high-performance polymers such as polyesters, polysulfones, and polyimides offers opportunities to enhance processing, barrier, stability, and mechanical properties.